New Free Non-Fiction Level 3/4 EBook + When Versus While   Leave a comment

There is a new, free, non-fiction ebook on the We Give Books website.  It is one of those wonderful DK books that have great illustrations and describe something from history or nature.  In this case, the topic is lions and tigers.

http://pearsonfoundation.cmail2.com/t/r-l-xhhjkc-thlhijtdiu-jy/

Big Cats

You do have to register for that group, but they will not try to sell you anything.  They are an NGO that wants people to read more.  They will only send you emails about new, free ebooks!

Enjoy!

Also, I had written in the past some tips about when to use the word “while,” because many of my Japanese students fail to use it.  One of my students explained to me that she still did not understand when to use “when” and when to use “while.”  Let me clear this up…

Try to place “when” and “while” in these four sentences:

____ I eat corn, it gives me diarrhea.

He got a ticket for talking on his cell phone _____ driving.

She had no choice but to study ______ she ate her dinner.

_____ you get to the store, don’t forget to buy some chicken.

Before you look, try these out and write down your answers.  Can you see the differences in when to use “when” and when to use “while?”  What do you think the difference is?  When you try to figure out the difference for yourself, you are more likely to remember it for future use.  Also, this is why I encourage my students to take even 15 minutes (30 is better) each night and read a book at your level in English , because you see the correct usage over and over.  This helps your mind to begin to automatically make these connections.  Your English will improve much more rapidly.

“When” is used to indicate “at that time.”  “While” is used to indicate “during an event or action.”

1) When I eat corn, it gives me diarrhea.  (During the time I am eating the corn, I don’t have stomach problems; it is after.  The times I eat corn this occurs.)

2) He got a ticket for talking on his cell ph0ne while driving.  (He was on the cell phone during the time he was supposed to be driving.  Two actions were going on at the same time.)

3)  She had no choice but to study while she ate her dinner.  (She had to eat and read at the same time.  Two actions were going on at the same time).

4) When you get to the store, don’t forget to buy some chicken.  (At the time you have completed arriving at the store, do the next action).  But, “I bought chicken while I was shopping ” – two actions at the same time.

Sometimes, you can use “when” and “while” interchangeably, but not always.  If you can use them interchangeably, it usually allows you to emphasize the time (when) or the two events or actions going on (while).

If you would like to practice this during your appointment, let me know.  As always, you can set an appointment here:

https://helpouts.google.com/100797727899452785350/ls/8f068d77df721208

Right now, Google is running a coupon code.  You can get a free first lesson with me, if you have never used a Google Helpout before.  The coupon code is: LAURIE15Z

If you would like to keep up on new information I post on the blog, click the black button on the bottom right-hand side of the page that says, “Follow.”

 

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Posted June 11, 2014 by laurieflood in Uncategorized

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