“Still” Versus “Yet”   Leave a comment

Hello, everyone!  Tip of the week –

Still Versus Yet

Do you know when to use the word “still” and when to use the word “yet?”

Still –

Still is used to mean something began in the past and is continuing now.

Examples –

1. There is still snow on the ground since the last snow two weeks ago.
2. I am still working on my major assessments for my Master’s program, so I had a very busy “holiday” season.
3. I was born in California and still live here.
4. Do you still play tennis?

Yet –

Yet is used to mean that it has not happened at this time, but we think it will happen in the future.

Examples –

1. It was warmer today, but the snow has not melted yet. (There is still snow on the ground.  It will melt in the future.)
2. Have you finished that book you started reading last month yet?
3. The officials have not yet determined the winner of the grand prize.

The new lessons to help students move from the picture story lessons to the documentaries have begun.  The first set of lessons will teach you how to learn many new vocabulary words in English by dividing words up into their common word parts and will teach you how to have a discussion in English about a topic of debate.

Laurie

Advertisements

Posted January 7, 2013 by laurieflood in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: